Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy's Blog

Posts for: December, 2012

By drkollias@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
December 28, 2012
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1. Skip the Fries

fries French fries and potato chips, two of the most common sides at fast food and sit-down restaurants, contain little or no nutritional value and large quantities of fat (oil). But they certainly are popular, which is why potatoes (in the form of fries and chips) are among the most frequently consumed "vegetables." Skip the grease and go without if at a fast-food restaurant (most only offer fries, onion rings or other fried options, although some do offer sides of corn, beans or rice, which are definitely healthier than fries or chips). At sit-down restaurants, it should be even easier to replace the fries / chips with a side of rice, a small baked potato and/or some veggies.

2. Watch What You Drink

soda Soft drinks are exactly what your body (and teeth) don't need, yet they are a staple beverage at fast-food and other restaurants. Water offers three distinct benefits by comparison: it doesn't cost you anything, it's calorie-free and it doesn't contain any sugar. While calorie- and sugar-free sodas are available, research suggests they may still be dangerous because artificial sweeteners may condition you to crave sweets and overeat. And do you really need a 32-ounce drink (of anything) with your meal?

3. No Oversized Loads

hamburger What's your average family meal at home like in terms of portion size? Unless you've purchased oversized plates, meals are generally within reason. Not so for an increasing number of fast-food chains and sit-down restaurants. "Super-sized" combo meals and 17-inch plates heaped with Thanksgiving-like portions are a recipe for weight gain. Stick to a reasonable portion size (or eat half and get the other half to go) and you won't have to unbutton the top button of your jeans midway through your meal.

4. Find a Veggie

veggie Depending on the nature of the establishment, this can be fairly easy or a bit tricky, but either way, it's a worthy pursuit. Whether it's a hamburger with lettuce and tomato or a plate of pasta with broccoli, choose meals that have some natural color, courtesy of Mother Nature's best vegetables. A burger with cheese, a bun and nothing else or a plate of pasta with cheese and cream sauce are missing the color of nutrition your body needs. Pizza is even easier; add a few veggies along with your other favorite toppings.

5. Know What You're Ordering

nutrition facts  In the past few years, the majority of restaurants have begun (by mandate and/or choice) to reveal how nutritionally unsound some of their meal options are. This can range from providing complete nutritional facts to listing calorie counts on the menu. Doing so gives you the upper hand when it comes to choosing a healthy (or at least healthier) meal for you and your family. Visit the Web sites of your favorite restaurants or review the nutritional information in-house before ordering. You'll be surprised at how much fat, sodium and calories are in some of your favorites; perhaps they won't be your favorites after you learn what's in them and you'll steer toward lower-fat, lower-calorie, better-for-you selections instead.

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813-884-1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com 

 


By drkollias@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
December 26, 2012
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Remember when "A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down" was the catch phrase of the day? Well, soon it might be, "A spoonful of honey means you don't need any medicine," because research suggests honey is an effective remedy for childhood cough.

While we're mired in the thick of another cold and flu season, it's time to remind parents of two important points: First, the Food and Drug Administration says cough and cold medications are not appropriate for children ages 6 and younger and may actually be dangerous; and second, research suggests honey may be the best treatment of all for helping children suffering from cough and related symptoms.

Let's deal with the safety issue first. Over the past several years, the FDA has progressively investigated over-the-counter cough and cold medications, many either with dosing instructions for adults and children or for children only, depending on the type/brand. With little research done involving children only (after all, what parent would want their child to be the guinea pig in one of those studies?), the general protocol was for dosing recommendations to be extrapolated from adults to children. In other words, there was little to no hard data providing any sort of a basis for how much of a given cough/cold medicine should be administered to children - or if it should be administered at all.

Eventually, the FDA figured this out and ruled that cough and cold medicines were inappropriate for children under the age of 2, then extended the ban to children under age 6 (and is considering a ban up to age 11, if not older).


In the past year or so, even the medications still considered appropriate for the 6-plus age group (at least for now) have come under fire, with more than a few product recalls for quality-control issues that resulted in a number of products (cough and cold, allergy, fever) made by several drug manufacturers being removed from the shelves for several months in 2010.

Wouldn't it be great if our kids had something natural to help them get rid of those nasty coughs, or at least minimize their duration? Well, perhaps they do: honey. For example, in a 2007 Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine study involving 105 children ages 2-18 with upper respiratory infections, children who were given buckwheat honey (between 1/2 and 2 teaspoons prior to bedtime, depending on age) coughed less and slept better than children who did not receive any honey or who received honey-flavored dextromethorphan (the primary active ingredient in many cough and cold medications).

Talk to your doctor for more information, and keep in mind that honey is not recommended for children in their first year because it may contain botulism spores, which can be harmful to young children's underdeveloped immune systems.  


 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813-884-1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com 


 


By drkollias@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
December 21, 2012
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Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays from the Doctors and Staff at Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy in Tampa!

Holiday Office Hours:

Saturday Dec 22nd,  9am - 1pm

Monday Dec 24 - Tuesday Dec 25th,      Office will be closed

Wednesday Dec 26th, 9am - 6pm

Thursday Dec 27th,  9am - 1pm

Friday Dec 28th,  9am - 6pm

Saturday Dec 29th,  9am - 1pm

Monday Dec  31st - Jan 1st,     Office will be closed.

(Begining January 2nd our office hours will return our regular schedule)

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813-884-1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com 

 


By drkollias@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
December 17, 2012
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Jennifer McKie!!! Thank you for participating in our Facebook 1-hour massage therapy drawing! Please give myself or Debbie a call at 813.884.1457 and we will be happy to schedule the hour for you or send you a gift certificate in the mail.

If you didn't win this time, don't fret! We will be hosting Facebook drawings on the 15th of every month. All you need to do to qualify is "Like" us on our Facebook page here and a winner will be randomly selected each time.

Thank you for your participation and good luck on our future drawings!

-:- Laura
 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com

 


By drkollias@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
December 17, 2012
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The short answer to this question is, “It depends.”

For example, the number of recommended adjustments may depend on why you sought chiropractic care in the first place. Were you concerned with pain, or recovery from an injury, or did you seek care to promote your overall health and wellness? The national average when dealing with pain and injury is 20 to 22 adjustments per patient, per injury. When the initial pain or injury has been relieved and treatment moves more into the area of general wellness care and health maintenance, the number of adjustments is almost always a partnership between the chiropractor and the patients. They work together to determine overall goals and set up an appropriate treatment schedule. Many patients find relief in their first visit and see considerable progress within a week or two of regular visits, and regular adjustments can become less necessary as your body stabilizes. Of course, this varies from patient to patient, depending on the nature of the injury and the stage of treatment they are in. In the first or acute stage, when the patient has first consulted a chiropractor, the primary goal may be to relieve pain and increase mobility, so several adjustments a week may be required to accomplish this.

However, the scar tissue and postural imbalance that can build up around spinal injuries can take some time to heal completely, so there may be a reconstructive or healing phase of treatment. This stage seeks to improve the strength and flexibility of soft tissue surrounding the area of the original injury. During this phase there are commonly fewer adjustments – from once a week to once a month. At first the patient may find in nearly every visit that their spine has slipped back out of adjustment and requires correction. When the spine starts holding its adjustments, however, treatment can be reduced to a check-up every few months.

The number of recommended adjustments may also vary depending on the nature of the services provided by the individual chiropractor. Some treatment approaches seek to correct problems in a few sessions, while others take a more long-term approach, constantly evaluating the patient’s progress and changing the treatment regimen accordingly to not just heal the immediate injury but develop a more healthy spine and lifestyle. Chiropractic care is to some extent an art form; there are many ways to adjust the spine, and many ways to determine whether the adjustment has been successful. This can depend on the chiropractor’s personal style, where they were educated, their experience, and many other factors.

To some extent the determination of how many adjustments you will need depends on you, your personal goals, and how much you want to benefit from chiropractic care. Some patients seek only resolution of pain or discomfort from an injury, and are not as interested in long-term therapies to improve their spinal and general health. Others choose to pursue treatment because they recognize the importance of maintaining a healthy spine, to prevent future injuries and increase their quality of life.

 

Resources:

http://www.ehow.com/video_4397485_how-many-chiropractic-visits-do.html
http://www.demosschiropractic.com/chiropractic-fidelity.cfm
http://www.back2harmony.com/faqs_treatment.html#howmany
 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com