Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy's Blog

Posts for: May, 2016

By contactus@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
May 27, 2016
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For a sport with a relatively short history (it began in Southern California in the 1930s), beach volleyball has become immensely popular in the U.S. and around the world. So much so that the Association of Volleyball Professionals (AVP) was founded in 1983 to promote the sport and its athletes, and it became an official sport of the Olympic Games in 1996. 

The AVP has always recognized that playing on an uneven surface puts a great deal of strain on the bodies of even well-conditioned athletes. So in order to help reduce the risk of injury and prolong players’ careers, the AVP hired a chiropractor named Tim Brown as its first Director of Sports Medicine. Another chiropractic physician named G. Douglas Andersen took over this role a couple of years later. It has become standard practice for a team chiropractor, along with all the necessary adjusting equipment, to accompany the team across the country to each competition on the AVP tour.

Chiropractor Allen M. Manison regularly works with beach volleyball players. He says, “When one considers volleyball injuries, usually the shoulder is the region that gets blamed most. This makes sense as we usually envision volleyball players ‘spiking’ the ball. The rotator cuff and other structures of the shoulder take a beating from the high force and movement that is required of the shoulder.” However, other parts of the body are prone to injury as well. Manison says “I have seen more neck, knee, hip, low back, toe, foot, ankle, and elbow injuries than I would’ve ever imagined! Shoulder injuries are actually about half of the way down on the list of injuries.”

Manison continued, “The beach volleyball game involves tremendous stresses on the body. First, it’s two people per each side of the net, so each athlete has to cover large areas in very short periods of time. Second, the athletes are throwing their bodies around in sand, which certainly does not help with movement. Third, although the sand gives way, the athletes are barefoot and are not getting lots of support for the aggressive maneuvers they are making while they play. Fourth, there is sometimes very little rest as winning teams need to keep playing, and without enough rest and recovery, the risk for injury is increased.”

April Ross, a US Olympic Team beach volleyball player, appreciated the benefits of growing up with chiropractic in her home. She said, “I’ve worked with a lot of chiropractors in my career as a professional beach volleyball player and I grew up having one as my dad, so I think my standards are pretty high! … It’s always pleasant going in for an adjustment. I get a lot of whiplash diving around in the sand and as long as I get in regularly to see [her chiropractor] Dr. Callotta I’m able to deal with it so that I can continue to compete. I don’t know what I would do without her. Now that I am heading to the Olympics I’m counting on her to keep me healthy and ready to win the gold!” (Editor’s note: She did win a silver medal!)

Lisa Rutledge, a professional beach volleyball player had this to say about her chiropractor: “I see Dr. J for chiropractic work about 2 to 3 times a week, and honestly, if I could go more, I would. I play beach volleyball and it takes a serious toll on your body. I’m traveling all over the world – I’m going to Moscow, to Rome, to Korea – and 20-hour flights are not fun. So when I get back my body is just out of alignment, it feels weird, it just doesn’t feel right. So as soon as I get off the plane I book my appointment with Dr. J and I get my adjustment and I feel 100 times better. It really does wonders for your body.”

 

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457

www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com



The adult human head weighs about 5kg (about 11 pounds), which, at rest, is comfortably supported by the bones and muscles of the neck. However, rapid movement backward and forward puts a much larger load on the cervical vertebrae and ligaments holding them in place. The anterior longitudinal ligament that runs down the back of the spine is particularly at risk of stretching or tearing during a rapid collision.

The signs  symptoms of whiplash associated disorders range from mild neck pain for a few days after the injury to headaches, arm pain and long-term restricted movement of the neck.  Studies have shown that whiplash injuries can also constrict blood flow to the brain, leading to light-headedness, poor concentration and fatigue.

Since 1995, the Québec Task Force (QTF) scale has been widely used to assess the severity of WAD and how they should be treated. Their grading system is as follows:

Grade  Classification

0  - No complaint about the neck. No physical signs
I  - Neck complaint of pain, stiffness or tenderness only. No physical signs
II - Neck complaint and musculoskeletal signs. Musculoskeletal signs include decreased range of motion and point tenderness
III - Neck complaint and neurological signs. Neurological signs include decreased or absent deep tendon reflexes, weakness and sensory deficits
IV - Neck complaint and fracture or dislocation

 

In addition to grading the injury based on your symptoms, our Tampa chiropractors at Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy can assess the injury by performing a thorough examination, palpating the affected area and observing your neck movement and any associated pain.

The recommended chiropractic treatment will depend on the severity of the injury, but common actions include treatment with heat and cold, chiropractic manipulation and a specific program of exercises to gently regain the full range of neck movement. A bag of frozen peas held against the neck for short periods is a good stop-gap treatment for moderate neck pain if you have to wait for an appointment.  MLS Laser therapy may be reccommended to aid reduction in pain and inflammation. Additionally, massage therapy may be suggested to facilitate healing to the involved muscles.

Pain medication may be required in grade II injuries and above (usually NSAIDs to reduce inflammation but narcotic pain relief may be prescribed for grade III WAD) and collars may also be used to keep the neck in place for 72 hours after grade II and III injuries to give the muscles and ligaments time to recover.Grade IV whiplash is a serious injury and your chiropractor can refer you to a specialist for treatment. This will at minimum consist of several months of neck immobilization and possibly surgery. Most whiplash injuries are, much less serious than this and are more likely to be a cause of pain and discomfort than a true medical emergency. Though, as anyone who has suffered with WAD will tell you, the distress associated with ongoing neck pain and stiffness can have a substantial impact on daily life, and it is well worth getting checked over by our chiropractors if you experience any signs of whiplash in order to reduce your healing time and reduce the chance of future neck complaints.

 


Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457
www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com


By contactus@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
May 23, 2016
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If you have ever experienced a sprain, you know how inconvenient it can be to locate some ice and a bag to put it in so that you can apply it to your injury.  After all, not everyone is “lucky” enough to get hurt at a home and have a bag of frozen peas on hand when it happens…

 

Even if you just have sore muscles from a strenuous workout, experts advise that you apply ice to relieve pain and speed recovery.  Biofreeze is a pain relieving gel that provides the same effect as ice, in a convenient, portable form that doesn’t tie you down.

Biofreeze is an analgesic that is useful for treating not only sprains and sore muscles, but also arthritis and other types of joint pain.  It comes in gel, spray or roll-on form, and is a type of cryotherapy (cold therapy).  Its active ingredient is menthol (from the mint family of plants), which causes your brain to interpret the nerve signals being sent as a sensation of cold, triggering a reduction in inflammation.

The cold therapy of Biofreeze works by causing ligand molecules to attach themselves to your nerve’s cold receptors, which effectively helps to numb the area, interfering with pain signals traveling to the brain.  Its menthol also induces vasodilation, which increases blood flow to the injury (a benefit over icing the area, as icing has the opposite effect), allowing cellular waste products to be swept away more efficiently and for healing oxygen and nutrients to be delivered to the cells.

Other herbal ingredients included in Biofreeze are Ilex Paraguariensis (also known as Yerba mate, a plant native to South America with antioxidant properties), Arnica, Calendula, Aloe, Boswellia, Green Tea, Burdock, Lemon Balm and vitamin E.  All of these have been used for centuries in treating tissue injuries such as bruises, sprains and strains.  Camphor, another ingredient in Biofreeze, has both numbing and antiseptic properties.

Our massage therapist at  Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy can massage the gel into your skin (or apply it with your personal roll-on or spray) up to four times a day.  It can also be useful before any type of therapy, such as chiropractic care or physical therapy, so as to relieve pain that may interfere with you getting the most out of your treatment.  Although it does not require a prescription, Biofreeze is not sold in stores.  Instead, it is often times available at many chiropractors and other health care practitioners who carry it for the benefit of their patients. Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy carries three main types of Biofreeze products for our patient's convenience; we offer a gel tube, roll-on or spray. Come by our office to try this excellent pain relieving product!

 

 

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457
www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com


By contactus@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
May 20, 2016
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If your body has suffered trauma, your muscles remember! The body is a fascinating thing. There are certain “safety switches” that exist in our muscles as a manner of protection from injury. Our Central Nervous System (CNS) communicates with our muscles through sensory organs called muscle spindles which are found in our muscles (Proske, Candevia, 2009). When a muscle is stretched, the CNS communicates to the spindle cells which stimulate a reflexive response to contract in order to protect the muscle from being injured (Hammer, 2012).

 

 In the case of an accident or injury where trauma occurs to the muscle, the spindle cells lower their threshold for stretch before they will   respond with a contraction. For instance, if a driver is struck by another driver on the left side of their vehicle, it is likely that the driver being struck will experience a force which causes their head to move violently to the right. When the impact causes the head to move to the right, the muscles on the left side of the neck will be stretched well beyond the normal capacity that the spindle cells would allow. Then, the CNS will send a message to those cells to pull back at a rapid pace in order to protect the body from any further damage. When this occurs, a new “stretch” threshold has been created for the spindle cells and adhesions between the muscle and fascia (fibrous tissue that wraps muscles and organs) occur (Hammer, 2012).

Following the accident, the driver generally attempts to go on with activities of daily living but may soon find that they are experiencing pain during activities where they never experienced pain before. Sometimes, even the act of holding ones head up can become a chore, let alone trying to go through the regular range of motion. At this point, the new threshold for the spindle cells has begun to take effect. Now, when the muscle that was over stretched begins to stretch throughout the course of daily activity, the CNS and muscle spindles are causing the muscle to contract. The adhesions between the muscle and the fascia are inhibiting normal communication between the spindle cells and the CNS. Generally, the muscles will end up in a continual state of tension or increased tonus. Being that muscles are what move our bones, this increased state of tension can make it difficult for an adjustment to take place and/or for the adjustment to hold.

 In order to restore the normal communication patterns of the CNS and muscle spindles, the massage therapist can work to break up the fascial adhesions. This process is like that of peeling the layers of an onion. Throughout each session, the therapist can work to break up the adhesions layer by layer. This process takes time, as it is important that the therapist work at a pace that the body is ready for. Remember, the spindle cells are now working at a lower threshold therefore, when the therapist stretches the muscles, they must do it slowly and carefully as to not push the new stretch threshold. During this time, the muscle spindles are being “retrained” regarding when to respond with a contractile response. With each session, the adhesions between the muscle and fascia can break apart. 

Once the adhesions are broken up, the therapist can work on any spasms that have occurred in the muscle in order to relax the state of tension it may be in (trigger point therapy). At this point, the therapist can begin active stretching with the patient in order to help increase range of motion without the muscle spindle and CNS causing the muscle to contract at the first sign of stretch. As this process happens, the muscles will begin to stay relaxed for longer periods of time following a massage and adjustment which will yield less pain. Additionally, the adjustments will begin to hold for a longer period of time. As the muscles return to their proper state of tonus, the patient can expect to see an increased range of motion, less muscle tension and therefore, less pain.

 When you are working with the body’s natural healing capabilities, consistency is key. It takes time to restore the body’s healthy state of equilibrium and regular maintenance can help to keep both the proper muscle tonus and vertebral alignment for optimal health.

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457
www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com

 

 


By contactus@sheldonroadchiropractic.com
May 18, 2016
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"Referred pain” can be a perplexing phenomenon for anyone who experiences it. Referred pain is what happens when you feel pain in an area of your body that is not actually the original source of the pain signals. The most common example of referred pain is when pain is felt in the left arm, neck or jaw of a person suffering a heart attack, while they often have no feelings of pain in the chest area itself.

 

It’s important to note that referred pain is different from radiating pain, in which the pain felt in one area travels down a nerve, causing pain along the length of the nerve. This is often the case with sciatica, where pain originates in the lower back and radiates down the leg.

Some experts believe that it is due to a mix-up in nerve messaging. The central nervous system (CNS) is constantly receiving a barrage of different messages from different parts of the body. These messages may get mixed up somewhere along the path between the place where the irritated nerve is signaling and the spinal cord or brain where pain signals are processed. With an extensive network of interconnected sensory nerves that serve the same region of the body, such as the nerves of the lower back, thighs and hips, it may be more common for signals to get mixed up than you might imagine.

Although referred pain is usually felt as painful, it can also cause feelings of numbness, tingling or the sensation of pins and needles. Another example of referred pain is a tension headache, in which headache pain is due to an irritation of the nerves in the neck.

Referred pain tends not to cross sides of the body. In other words, if the pain signals are originating in the liver or gallbladder (which are on the right side of the body), you may feel pain in your right shoulder. If the signals originate in the pancreas (on the left of the body), you may feel pain in your left shoulder, etc.

Chiropractic adjustments can address the source of the referred pain, leading to long-term pain relief. Nerves in the area of the spinal cord that are irritated due to a spinal misalignment (subluxation) can be a cause of referred pain. When your chiropractor adjusts your spine, he or she removes the source of irritation, thus providing relief.

The Doctors at Sheldon Road Chiropractic and Massage Therapy in Tampa are experienced in determining the origins of where pain comes from by utilizing digital x-ray, performing orthopedic tests and reviewing patient health history.

 

 

 

Sheldon Road Chiropractic & Massage Therapy
10930 Sheldon Road
Tampa, FL 33626
813.884.1457
www.sheldonroadchiropractic.com